A Philly Story: The Cathedral

In keeping with the theme of church related items from Philly, I want to feature some from the another area congregation.  Like private homes and commercial buildings, houses of worship occasionally take on updates and restoration.  The Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception had in the basement a collection of no longer used items from the church, social rooms, rectories and class rooms.

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image source: http://ukrcathedral.com/about.html

The Cathedral is located in the Northern Liberties district in Philadelphia and was erected in 1966. This building replaced the old Cathedral Church at that time.  Inside and out the Cathedral is gorgeous but as the website says, “the completion of the interior embellishments is an ongoing process which will continue over the years.”

Some changes are choices and some are not.  It is common practice for Catholic Churches to have displays of small candles for the faithful to use as part of a devotional prayer.  More and more, these real candles are no longer used in churches for insurance purposes and are being replaced with electric or battery powered prayer candles. The Cathedral is one of those places that has decided to switch, and now these beautiful displays are available in our store.

The large gold displays have 102 small holders in the center and 20 large holders on the sides and across the top.  In the center of the top is an electrified light socket under the cap and cross.  They measure 65″ wide and 21 1/2″ deep and have small casters.  We have 2 of these.  They do not include glass votive inserts or candles.

The one smaller iron display has 40 small holders and 5 large ones across the back.  The base is twisted and scrolled wrought iron.  There is a slot for donations on the front.  The total dimensions for this smaller one are 28.25″wide by 44″high and 15.5″deep.

I hear you, you aren’t a Church, so what the heck would you do with a piece like this.  No worries.  We have some ideas…wine rack. cups with craft supplies. bird feeder.  Or how about this one?  Take the top section off.  Put the candle holder in your unused or faux fireplace and partially fill it with candles.  Now it looks like you have a blazing fire.  You can use the base as an aquarium stand, plant stand, or garden art.  Can you imaging dozens of tiny herbs growing in them?

Let’s see what else we have acquired from the cathedral.  A few short pews that are 54″ long, shown below. The back is 32″ high, the seat is 17″ off the floor in the front. Several have kneelers attached but they can be removed. Stained and varnished oak.  They are a nice size for a front entry or mud room where people are taking shoes on and off.

 

Holy water “urn” with a stainless steel upper canister marked HOLY WATER on the top handle and an aluminum legged base. It stands 45″ high and could have many reuse options (with no disrespect intended to its original use).  Exceptionally clean and unmarred.  Lemonade?

Next up: front row pew.  Paneled section in varnished oak with capped ends, kneeler, Bible holder on back side.  Front side is also beautiful paneled wood, no seats.  8′ 1″ long by 38″ tall at end cap.

The Cathedral housed a school for many years so we now have several chairs that have an arm with a tablet table, all right handed. Some seats have numbers stenciled on the back, and the traditional school desk carvings.  Wood is varnished and frames are sturdy metal.

This is interesting…a 49″ tall octagon cupola or dome. Brilliant and metallic colors, beautifully painted, tiered with an onion top that may have been the base for a cross(?).  It is quite a stunning piece.

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Assorted tall metal candle holders originally used in the main sanctuary.  Very sturdy.  Could be spray painted a new more inspiring color.  Would make great bird bath stands.

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This is a special find.  A bell/gong from the church.  This was used during special services and events.  Made of bronze it has a sacred sounding tone when rapped with the wooden mallet.

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We would like to take the opportunity to that the community at the Cathedral for their dedication to reuse by offering these materials to Restore of Philadelphia.  Let’s give them new life!

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Top 10 Architectural Salvage Items to Repurpose for Your Home

It’s a hot word in today’s online world of DIY blogging and made over décor: Repurpose.  But what does it really mean to “repurpose” something? Google has informed me that to repurpose means to “adapt for use in a different purpose.”  This is one of my favorite words, and working at ReHouse I have daily inspiration.  It got me to wondering, what are the most popular architectural salvage items to repurpose?  I’ve done my fair share of upcycling, as it is also called, but I turned to the DIY pros via Pinterest for some guidance on the topic.

I conducted a search on Pinterest for “repurpose architectural salvage” and gathered my data on the frequency with which each item or category appeared in the results.  I then compared those results with our own POS database and the quantity of each item or category we sold in 2016 and 2017 so far (these numbers will be listed in parenthesis for each category or subcategory).  I have concluded that the top 10 architectural salvage items to repurpose (in no particular order) must be

Doors (1081)

Interior (709), exterior(209), paneled wood, metal, wood with leaded glass, rustic/barn (53), sliding, folding, painted or natural, hundreds of DIYers are adapting doors to fit their décor needs and styles.  These photos all come from ReHouse customers who have reinstalled or repurposed the doors they purchased here.

Top left: Tim repurposed a pair of oversized doors from a garage or barn into outdoor privacy walls on his deck. Top right: Exterior door with side lites and arched transom from Victorian home in Hornell, NY reinstalled at MCM Natural Stone in Rochester, NY. Center right: wood interior door with beautiful grain turned on its side is now a customer’s headboard. Bottom right: an assortment of paneled interior wood doors pieced together to make the sales counter at Grossman’s Nursery also in Rochester, NY.  Bottom left: side folding wood and glass garage doors became a space divider in a clothing store in NYC.

Windows (955)

Technically these are window sashes or one part of the whole window unit.  Most DIYers using windows seem to choose older wood framed sashes with divided lites (256), leaded glass (100) or the occasional stained glass (31).  Pinterest has window project round ups that include “25+ DIY Repurposed Window Ideas” and “40 Simple Yet Sensational Repurposing Projects for Old Windows.”  Wall decor seems to be a very popular result, and here are a few I would be happy to hang in my home.

Left to right.  1. Frame a fun favorite poster within the divided lites and add a whimsical accent to the front like Cassie from Little Red Window.  2. Feature a collection of small stained glass windows on an empty wall like this arrangement from Pinterest said to be in the home of John McGivern.  3. At Right Up My Alley Design on Etsy I found inspiration for painting on glass just as I would on a canvas.  4. I could not find any one to which I can attribute this creative enclosed frame except that it is obviously from the family of Sgt. Gregory W Ball.  Cases and cabinets seem to be a natural progression in window repurposing.

Left: By Your Hands featured this cabinet with windows as doors but did not know where it originally came from.  You could use a pre-built cabinet or build one to suit a found window.  Similar to one at my house, this cold frame from Grow Garden Tomatoes will protect your sprouting plants in the cool spring.

Metal Accents

Metalwork that was a part of something else in a former life often peeks through or sometimes even dominates architectural vignettes.  In ReHouse these items fit into all categories.  Among the top choices for salvaged metalwork are fence sections or pieces (73), gates with some sort of latch (7), heating grates (180), tin ceiling (361), lamp/lighting parts (320), and other metal do-dads, tools, and thingies from who knows what (I don’t have a number for that).

Top row, left to right: Narrow console table using reclaimed wood and wrought iron fence pieces, this post led me back to Cass at Remodelaholic. An aged run-of-the-mill chain link fence gate becomes a decorating focal point when hung above the fireplace and adorned with a natural arrangement at Back Porch Musings.  Those little dod-dads come in handy when making unique wind chimes as Rebecca discovered from life. by hand.  Tear that ugly fabric off an old lamp shade, invert, and let it hold up your tulips (no attribution).  Bottom row, left to right: Antique heating grates set into the ground and filled with colored stones become and enchanted walking path aparently from Hometalk. Make your own toilet paper holder out of pipe pieces or purchase at Reclaimed Art.  This lovely bouquet accent lamp is made of lamp parts with a touch of hardware for the blossoms by Jack at Jack Riley Lighting.

Hardware (9725)

That leads us into another broad category that spans all types of door knobs (816), door plates (688), drawer pulls and knobs (2451), latches (205), hinges (1348), hooks (217), escutcheons (162), and brackets (64).  I was surprised to discover that many hardware repurposing projects are resulting in beautiful and unique jewelry.  There are also many customers at ReHouse who want to give their kitchen or furniture a makeover with new knobs or pulls.

Top row, right to left: ReHouse customer, Alissa Laine, restored this beautiful dresser by replacing the knobs with original glass.  1/2 of a hinge + 2 typewriter keys = a classy hook for necklaces made by Paul at Etsy shop StrangeTanks.  An antique eschutcheon (that key hole thing) and a few beads create a simple and elegant statement from a web page that is no longer active.  Some shabby chic door knobs are retrofitted for candles and rented out as wedding decor at Something Borrowed.  Bottom left:  One of my favorite uses for antique hardware has to be the addition of a door plate from ReHouse to a real and functioning guitar by Jonathan at Postal Commerce.  A statement piece worthy of a red carpet event this necklace features an antique drawer pull and (I think) precious stones made at Retreaux Girl.  Another ReHouse customer (whose name has been sadly misplaced) used 12 point glass door knobs and a wood door header to create an elegantly rustic coat rack.

Wood Trim and Accents

This is admittedly a large and varied category.  People are using corbels (76), plinth blocks (76), door headers (over 150 linear feet), column capitals, and pieces of wood appliqué.  It also includes all types of turned wood findings such as balusters (149), newel posts (8), columns (57), and furniture parts like chair spindles (145 chairs) and table legs.

Top left: An antique extra large corbel mounted on the wall becomes a plant stand at the Bachman’s Spring 2011 Ideas House and captured by Itsy Bits and Pieces.  Top center: Using some salvaged wood trim our customer Ms. Farnung created a lovely space to display her jewelry.  Top right: Decorative plinth blocks used to adorn the bottom corners of doorways where 2 types of trim meet.  Add a hook of your choosing and mount them to hang hats, necklaces, or dish towels like My Desert Cottage.  Bottom row: Matching corbels are used to support a shelf in the dining room at the Red Chandelier.   An unidentified but beautiful piece of salvaged wood repurposed as a table lamp by Meyer Interiors.

Mantels (33)

Pinterest viewers are not inundated with mantels as they may be doors or windows, but the end results are so beautiful and inspiring I feel they have earned a spot in the top ten.  These mantels are might be striped, sanded, painted, and/or stained.  Many live their new lives simply as restored mantels for real or imagined fireplaces, but often they are transformed into headboards, book shelves, or even a mirror frame.

Top left: upholstered mantel headboard by Rhonda at My Blue Creek Home.  Top right: shabby chic arched mantel headboard from a compilation at Country Design Home.  Middle right: mantel turned bookshelf found on Pinterest from an old Ebay link.  Bottom right: small mantel repurposed as a bathroom mirror frame at Neighbor’s Hill Bakery and Cafe in Arkansas (photo by Aunt Ruthie at Sugar Pie Farmhouse).  Bottom left: imagined fireplace vignette at Chateau Chic.

Shutters (224)

Both interior and exterior, shutters are used in a variety of household vignettes and projects.  Interior shutters are usually shorter and narrower.  These were more for privacy that for protection as large outdoor shutters were.  In case you’re interested, the most popular exterior shutter color is green if our inventory is any indication

Top row, left to right:  Gail Wilson at My Repurposed Life made this handy magazine rack with one wide interior shutter.  A tool caddy using 2 small interior shutters made by customer Gail Miller at a ReHouse workshop last year.  Four small interior shutters painted white and attached to form a box hangs from a chain and lights up the space (unknown source).  Bottom left: A lovely autumn vignette featuring a pair of shutters in another customer’s home.   Bottom right: I’ve seen many display shelves made with a shutter as the back but this one includes a light at the top and doubles as a hall tree with coat hooks (unknown source).

Furniture (1633)

At ReHouse our furniture sales are topped by cabinets of all types (1027).  Far below that come chairs (145) and tables (131) and then just drawers all by themselves.  Many DIYers are following the painted furniture trend which is sometimes covered by the repurposed umbrella.  Here I would like to show some amazing examples of furniture repurposed as some totally unexpected things.

Top right:  wooden head and foot boards become a sunny bench for one customer.  Center left:  a refrigerator on its back and covered in barn wood will now hold all the cold drinks for the party at another customer’s house.  Top right: dresser – drawers + wallpaper = dollhouse (unknown source).  Bottom left: another foot board with some shabby chic paint and a dozen small hooks can hold all your tea cups and saucers on the wall (link went to Hometalk). Bottom right: From Gypsy Barn this upright piano has been gutted and fitted with shelves and a drawer to be used as a dining room feature.

Lighting Globes & Shades (528)

Although we do sell the occasional fabric shade for lamps or sconces (24), most of the Globes & Shades (427) category consists of antique or vintage glass ones.  These come in every shape and size and fit all different lamps ceiling mount, chandeliers, pendants, table, wall, even under the cupboard and over the vanity.  They are available for indoors or outdoors, attic, basement, or garage.  I never knew there were so many! On top of that, individual chandelier crystals (101) make up a significant portion of all lighting related glass sales.

Top left: Use round glass globes as a mold for these trendy concrete spheres by following the tutorial by Steve & Kathy at The Garden Glove.  Top right: Search out ridged white globes, add a “stem” and create an autumn display that won’t rot before Halloween, Homeward Found Decor.  Bottom left:  Another great tutorial, this one from Addicted 2 Decorating, shows how to turn the classic school house globes into a succulent centerpiece.  Bottom center:  Two very different glass shades come together with some glass glue to become your new favorite cake plate worthy of the finest celebrations like these from DIY Homer.  Bottom right: Solar lights with a twist, this DIY project uses normal outdoor solar lights and glass shades from a common ceiling fan to light up Gail’s porch at My Repurposed Life.

Commercial

Ok, I hear you…”what kind of category is commercial?”  This may not be on the top ten for Pinterest posts.  It may not even be defined as architectural salvage at all, but this year ReHouse has sold over 700 square feet of bowling alley.  That’s right, bowling alley.  I’m taking a guess that the customers who purchased these 700 square feet are not installing a home bowling alley.  The other option?  They must be repurposing it.

Now 700 square feet is very heavy.  It requires commitment to salvage, commitment to purchase, and commitment to repurpose.  With all that commitment I shall add my own.  I commit to giving Bowling Alley its very own post within the next few weeks featuring only projects completed by ReHouse Customers.  If you haven’t sent photos of your bowling alley project yet, now would be a good time.

Until then, what will you repurpose today?

 

Fun Find: Umbrella Stands

Occasionally ReHouse will acquire several of one type of item.  Maybe this is because someone gave up a collection or cleaned out the house of a hoarder.  Whatever the reason, last week we received about a dozen umbrella stands.  Not the ornate ones from the entryway of a Victorian mansion.  The kind that lives on the patio and is heavy as you-know-what.  The kind that hides under the outdoor dining table and holds the shade umbrella steady during summer meals.

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Maybe you are like me.  I have one of these under my small patio table.  It has been there since we moved in 5 years ago.  It once held a  green and white striped canvas umbrella.  Sadly, the umbrella broke 4 years ago, but the stand is holding firm.  The arrival of these in the store made me think.  Does everyone’s umbrella break?  What are we going to do with all these stands?  If the umbrellas break, doesn’t everyone already have extra stands and instead need new umbrellas?

Can these heavy and decorative stands be used for something else?  Hmmm… Pinterest, here I come!  Here is what my search turned up for you.

  1. DIY Umbrella Stand into an Easy Patio Table from Victoria at Dazzle While Frazzeled  This is a well detailed DIY post with easy to follow instructions and great pictures.  Nice work, Victoria!DIY-Umbrella-Stand-Patio-Side-Table-collage-7
  2. Vintage Bike Planter.  I do not believe this is a real bike but it could certainly be the inspiration for something similar.  Found on Pinterest. Photo from flickr user Carmen Moreno. 55ff9426f2841b992f3056b68aa12040
  3. Repurposed Bird Feeder made from various pans and metal dishes with umbrella stand as the base.  (There was no link to an original post with this one.) www.pinterest.com
  4. Garden Fountain.  This is a store bought example from Loluxe on Shopify.  With a little help from This Old House and some spare parts you can certainly make your own.  89529a999d6a1ee3ed322a23209dac17.jpg
  5. Umbrella Stand.  Obvious perhaps, but maybe you have a less-than-pleasing umbrella without a stand.  Don’t throw it out just yet.  Penny at Penny’s Vintage Home shows you how to refashion your old, ugly umbrella to make it fit in your shabby chic outdoor living space.  PicMonkey Collage

Have you been inspired?  I know I have.  I am partial to the shabby chic umbrella.  I am also considering the small patio table but with a chess board.  Let me know what you plan to do.  You can always post your reuse projects on Instagram with #reusewithrehouse and we will feature your project on our feed too!  Here are some more pics of the stands we have available.  Get’em before they’re gone.

 

Wedding Trends Made Rent-able

Wedding season is approaching for 2017, and according to the top wedding trend sites (the knot, Bridal Guide, Glamour), couples this year are envisioning weddings styled with “vintage glamour” and situated in creative natural spaces.  Even with the popular themes of elaborate food pairings and bountiful blooms, a return to live bands, and portrait painters alongside photographers, today’s couples are also focused on going green in more ways than one.

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Current popular venues are no longer limited church basements, conference centers, or banquet halls.  While these are excellent and often economical choices where you can be sure practice has made perfect, couples are branching out[doors].  Whether actually indoors or out, more weddings are featuring natural elements.  Free flowing bouquets offer the ambiance of an English Garden.  Potted dwarf trees bring the garden indoors.  Wood and stone elements complete the enchanted forest effect.

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The ultimate example of bringing the outdoors in…the avenue of trees at the royal wedding in 2011.  – photo by Murray Sanders for dailymail.co.uk

Going green is not only a desirable decor style.  Couples today are taking on an environmental responsibility to go green as they plan their special days.  Invitations are being printed on recycled paper with soy based inks.  Flowers are being donated after the ceremony for others to enjoy.  Vintage china, silver, glassware, and linens are all being rented to eliminate waste even for casual receptions.  Couples are being more aware of the lasting impressions left by their weddings.  William and Kate may have started this trend when they went green by planting the English Field Maples that adorned Westminster after the royal wedding.

These 3 doors have been in the racks for years…should they be trashed?

At ReHouse we make decisions daily about what we let go to waste and what we are able to save for reuse.  We strive to encourage others to do the same when planning a remodel, restoration, or deconstruction of homes and buildings.  What if we could do the same for weddings?

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or should they be transformed with some paint and hinges?

We have always offered a rental option for items being used in theatrical productions or other short term events.  This option allows the renter to use the item as a prop for a predetermined period of time and then return it in like condition.  An item could be saved from the landfill when we salvage it from a house and then again when it is returned as a rental rather than purchased for a one-time use and thrown out For 50% of the retail price, if it’s in stock, you can rent it.

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What do we rent out most?  Doors.  In fact doors are so popular as wedding rentals we have decided to create some easy-up wedding backdrops and props using some of our 1000+ in stock doors.  These special event creations are available for one day rentals for the price listed.  Since we are closed on Sundays, Saturday to Monday rentals are considered “one day.”  We loved making them, and we hope that you will love using them for your next event.

PW0007Pale Green, 2 Door Backdrop – features matching solid wood oversized 6 panel doors with upper lites. Painted with durable indoor/outdoor paint in pale green.  Hardware detailing is also handpainted.  Triangle stands on each door and removable top trim support this elegant piece.  Add your own matching floral accents and tulle trim. $225

16938855_10154435757656588_2048778553315398483_nFarmhouse Chic Extra Large Arbor – built from locally salvaged barn wood horse stalls. Rear panel handcrafted to match.  Pergola style top asks to be draped with flowers, fabric, or candles that coordinate with your event’s decor. Designed and built for quick and easy assembly and tear down. $225

16904859_10154435754886588_4085692690442794175_oWhite Bridal Walk-Through Arbor – created with 2 doors slightly different in design painted fresh white to match any color scheme.  Feet on bottom and slats on top provide support for this pergola style arbor.  Perfect for a photo prop, ceremony backdrop, or to frame the bride’s entrance down the aisle, this piece places you right in the garden.  $195

Dragonflies for the Garden Fence

Every day we help our customers find just the right salvaged item to add to their period homes creating works of architectural beauty.  Most people do not know that every day we also help our customers find just the right salvaged item to create works of art.

Jack came in recently on a mission for his daughter.  She had found some amazing dragonflies on Pinterest that can be used to liven up a boring garden fence.  He wanted to make a few for her and came to us for the salvaged items: fan blades and table legs.

inspirationThe first inspiration image he showed me on his phone was this one.  Originally pinned from, Saved By Love Creations, blogger Johnnie Collier offers a detailed tutorial for making these spunky guys from vintage ceiling-fan blades and decorative table legs.  She shows each step including how to shape the fan blades and add painted details.  Johnnie starts out by sharing with her readers where her original inspiration came from…

inspiration2Her inspiration happens to also be the next one Jack showed me when he came in.  Lucy Laglois from Lucy Designs Online shows in step by step detail how she made her original dragonflies. Lucy’s tutorial includes details on how she added decorative molding and fancy saw work to her elegant insects.  Her images also show the original state of her salvaged finds.

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check our basement for all spindles, piano legs, and balusters

Jack and I took a look around the ReHouse Architectural Salvage store for some wings and bodies.  We discovered 5 ceiling fan blades for $1 a piece, and he chose 3 salvaged banister spindles for $5 each.  For $20 Jack was able to create these 3 unique winged insects for his daughter’s garden fence.